Don E. Gibbons, Ph.D., NJ Licensed Psychologist #03513
This Blog is published for information and educational purposes only. No warranty, expressed or implied, is furnished with respect to the material contained in this Blog. The reader is urged to consult with his/her physician or a duly licensed mental health professional with respect to the treatment of any medical or psychological condition.

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The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC

The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC, is located at 675 Route 72 E Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Telephone us at(609)709-2043 and (609) 709-0009.Take Mill Creek Road South, just off Route 72, on the road to Beach Haven West.After about 400 feet, turn right into the office complex of Greater Coastal Realty. Then turn right and go past the Lyceum Gyn. Continue on to the Prudential Zack Building. We. are the last office at the end. We accept Medicare and most other major insurance.Weekend and evening office hours are avalable.

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Friday, February 28, 2014

Do Alternate Universes Really Exist?



In sub-atomic physics, an electron can be in several places at the same time, and its position is only fixed in one place when it is observed -- or so goes the theory.

Imagine that we place a living cat into a steel chamber, along with a device containing a vial of hydrocyanic acid, and a radioactive substance. If even a single atom of the substance decays during the test period, a relay mechanism will trip a hammer, which will, in turn, break the vial and kill the cat. The observer cannot know whether or not an atom of the substance has decayed, and consequently, cannot know whether or not the cat has been killed. According to quantum law, the observation or measurement of sub-atomic particles affects an outcome, so that the outcome as such does not exist unless the measurement is made. (That is, there is no single outcome unless it is observed.) We know that this actually occurs at the subatomic level, because there are observable effects of interference, in which a single particle is demonstrated to be in multiple locations simultaneously.

What that fact implies about the nature of reality on the observable level (cats, for example, as opposed to electrons) is one of the stickiest areas of quantum physics. We're in one universe if we see that the cat is alive at the end of the test period, and we are in another one if we see that the cat is dead. But not everyone agrees with this conclusion. Einstein said, "I refuse to believe that God plays dice with the Universe."  Schrödinger himself is rumored to have said, later in life, that he wished he had never met that cat.

Today, however, if you ask physicists about the existence of alternate universes, most of them will agree that it is a definite possibility. The cover of the February 17 edition of Time features a story about "the infinity machine," a supercooled computer which according to one theory of quantum physics, is "the first techniology that allows useful tasks to be performed in collaboration between parallel universes."   Time states that research with these computers, each one costing $10,000,000, is "backed by Jefff Bezos, NASA, and the CIA," and is proceeding rapidly.


Monday, February 24, 2014

You Can't Just "Commit" a Crazy Relative, Neighbor, or Co-Worker!

Did you ever wonder why there are so many obviously mentally ill people wandering about in the center of large cities? Have you ever thought that you might have to commit that crazy relative, neighbor, or co-worker who talks back to the television and believes that he or she is receiving messages by telepathy? Have you heard of families whose members are constantly fighting and threatening to "commit" one another? Civil rights come first -- and It may not be as easy as you think!

When I was working at a psychiatric hotline, I received a call from a woman who wanted us to come out and commit her grandmother. She was also talking back to the television. In addition, she believed that the airplanes flying over her house were transmitting messages intended especially for her.  I asked the caller if her mother had ever attempted or threatened to commit suicide, or if she had ever harmed or threatened to harm anyone else. I was assured that she had not. The caller also told me that she was certain that her mother had no intention of doing so in the future.

"How does she get her needs taken care of?" I asked.  I was told that her husband does all the grocery shopping and cooks and cleans for her. She was perfectly able to dress herself and care for her own personal hygiene.

I told the caller that we could not even come out to interview her mother. In New Jersey, as well as in other states and many other nations, you do not merely have to be mentally ill in order to be committed, you also have to be dangerous because you are mentally ill. if you are not a danger to anyone else, and if your needs are being taken care of despite the fact that you are so crazy that you would be a danger to yourself were it not for the assistance of others, you are beyond the reach of the mental health system no matter how crazy you may happen to be.


If you are suicidal, on the other hand, you are automatically assumed to be crazy, and that alone will almost certainly get you a one way ticket to the mental hospital. For example, as we were discharging a retired social studies teacher from the hospital after she had received medical treatment for a broken hip, I was asked to screen her because she had casually remarked that she was going to go home and kill herself. When she admitted this during my psychiatric screening, I gently informed her that we would have to keep her in the hospital and admit her to the psychiatric ward. She angrily told me that she had the right to take her own life if she wanted to, and nobody had the right to stop her. Since she was a retired social studies teacher, I told her, "Even in a democracy, we can take away your civil rights in order to save your life." She drew herself up to her fall five feet in height and looked me straight in the eye and used terms which I never expected to hear from the lips of a social studies teacher! 

She was admitted to the hospital psychiatric ward, and when she had satisfied the staff that she was suicidal she was released and allowed to return to her home. Several months later, I heard that she had regain her physical health and was doing quite well psychologically.

When someone has expressed an intention to commit suicide or to harm someone else, a telephone call to your local police department or psychiatric hot line is usually all that is needed to alert the proper authorities, and they will determine whether the problem is a legal or a psychiatric one. Voluntary admission to a mental hospital is also possible under similar circumstances if the person who is having such feelings is willing to make the call. Nevertheless, no matter how crazy one happens to be, unless their behavior also poses a legal risk to themselves or others, there is often not much that you or anyone else can do. Your local laws may vary, and no set of statements fits every possible contingency. Therefore, this posting is not intended to serve as a substitute for legal or professional advice.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

How to Cope With the Inevitability of Death


If you can dream, and not make dreams your master.
If you can think, and not make thought your aim.
If you can meet with triumph and disaster,
And treat those twin impostors just the same. . . .
                                                                                             --Rudyard Kipling



Randy Pausch was a popular computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon University. At the peak of his career, he was diagnosed with terminal cancer and given only a few months to live. In his last lecture, he provided a model for all of us on how to face the certainty of our own death -- with courage, humor, and concern for others. It is an understatement to say that his talk went viral on the Internet! Now, unlerss you are one of the lucky ones who downloaded it before it became too popular to give away, you have to buy it. Here is what he had to say.